Probate is the legal process that follows the death of an individual in the UK. During this process, the deceased person’s assets are distributed to their heirs or beneficiaries. Probate forms are an essential part of the probate process, and they are used to apply for probate, calculate inheritance tax, and distribute the deceased person’s assets. Please note that many of these forms are available both print and post and as online probate forms.

Probate can be a complex and time-consuming process so if you need some expert guidance when applying for probate a good place to start is with some free probate advice from a Member of The Probate Network. They can help you navigate the probate process and complete the necessary forms correctly. For advice you can either request an appointment or if you want to know the cost of support from a probate specialist, request a probate quote.

Below we provide a summary of some of the main probate forms in England and Wales.

PA1: Probate Application Form

This is the main form used to apply for probate. It includes information about the deceased person, the executors, and the assets and liabilities of the estate. It is used to apply for a grant of representation (known as Grant of Probate if there is a valid Will or Letters of Administration when there is no will and the rules of intestacy apply) which is the legal document that gives the executor or administrator the authority to deal with the deceased person’s estate.

The form includes important information about the deceased person, such as their full name, date of birth, date of death, and place of death. It also requires information about the executor or administrator, including their full name, address, and relationship to the deceased person.

In addition, the form asks for details about the deceased person’s assets and liabilities, including bank accounts, property, and investments. This information is used to determine the value of the estate and whether or not inheritance tax is due.

Completing the PA1 form can be a complex process, and it’s important to ensure that all information is accurate and complete. Any mistakes or omissions can cause delays in the probate process and may even result in legal issues down the line. Getting this form wrong is one of the risks of being an executor or administrator who can be held personally liable if mistakes are made.

If you need some expert guidance with your probate application a good place to start is with some free probate advice from a probate specialist from The Probate Network. They can help you navigate the probate process and complete the necessary forms correctly. For advice you can either visit probate advice options a or if you want to know the cost of support from a probate specialist, request a probate quote.

IHT205: Inheritance Tax Form

This form is used to claim an exemption from inheritance tax (IHT) for estates that are below the IHT threshold, which at the time of writing is £325,000. It is also used to claim some other exemptions and reliefs. It is also known as the “small estate” form.

If the estate is valued at less than £325,000 and there are no other complicating factors, such as gifts made by the deceased in the years leading up to their death, then the IHT205 form can be used to claim an exemption from inheritance tax.

The form requires information about the deceased person, including their full name, date of birth, and date of death. It also requires information about their assets and liabilities, such as bank accounts, property, and investments.

In addition, the IHT205 form asks for information about any gifts made by the deceased person in the seven years before their death. If gifts were made, the value of these gifts may need to be taken into account when calculating inheritance tax.

Completing the IHT205 form can be a complex process, and it’s important to ensure that all information is accurate and complete. Any mistakes or omissions can cause delays in the probate process and may even result in legal issues down the line for which the executors or administrators can be held personally liable.

If you need some expert guidance a good place to start is with some free probate advice from a probate practitioner from The Probate Network. They can help you navigate the probate process and complete the necessary forms correctly. For advice you can either visit probate advice options a or if you want to know the cost of support from a probate specialist, request a probate quote.

IHT400: Inheritance Tax Account Form

This form is used to calculate the amount of IHT due on an estate and to pay the tax owed. It includes details of the deceased person’s assets and liabilities and any exemptions and reliefs claimed.

The IHT400 form is a detailed Inheritance Tax Account form used in the UK to calculate and report the amount of inheritance tax owed by the estate of a deceased person. It is used when the estate of the deceased person is above the inheritance tax threshold, which is currently set at £325,000.

The form requires information about the deceased person, their assets and liabilities, and any gifts or transfers of value made by the deceased person during their lifetime. The IHT400 form is used to calculate the value of the estate and the amount of inheritance tax owed based on the current inheritance tax rates and allowances.

In addition to the basic information required for the IHT205 form, the IHT400 form requires more detailed information about the deceased person’s assets and liabilities, such as valuations of property, business assets, and investments. The form also requires information about any debts owed by the deceased person, as these can be deducted from the value of the estate when calculating inheritance tax.

Completing the IHT400 form can be a complex process, and it’s important to ensure that all information is accurate and complete. Any mistakes or omissions can cause delays in the probate process and may even result in legal issues down the line as well as underpayment or over payment of inheritance tax.

If you need some expert guidance a good place to start is with some free probate advice from a probate practitioner from The Probate Network. They can help you navigate the probate process and complete the necessary forms correctly. For advice you can either visit probate advice options a or if you want to know the cost of support from a probate specialist, request a probate quote.

PA15: Renunciation Form

This form is used by an executor or administrator who wishes to renounce their role. It must be completed and submitted to the Probate Registry before a replacement executor or administrator can be appointed.

It is a form that must be completed by an executor or administrator who has been named in a will but wishes to renounce their appointment and decline to act as the personal representative of the deceased person’s estate.

The PA15 form is also known as the Renunciation of Probate or Renunciation of Letters of Administration. It is a declaration by the executor or administrator that they are renouncing their appointment and declining to act in the administration of the estate. The form must be completed and signed in the presence of a commissioner for oaths, who will then sign and stamp the form to confirm that the executor or administrator has renounced their appointment.

If you are named as an executor or administrator in a will and wish to renounce your appointment, it is recommended that you seek the assistance of a legal professional who can guide you through the process and ensure that the form is completed correctly. It is important to note that once an executor or administrator has renounced their appointment, they cannot change their mind and take up the appointment at a later date.

If you need some expert guidance a good place to start is with some free probate advice from a probate practitionerfrom The Probate Network. They can help you navigate the probate process and complete the necessary forms correctly. For advice you can either visit probate advice options a or if you want to know the cost of support from a probate specialist, request a probate quote.

IHT421: Probate Summary Form

This form is used to provide a summary of the estate to HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) for inheritance tax purposes.

The IHT421 Probate Summary Form is a legal document used in the United Kingdom in the process of applying for a Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration. It is a form that must be completed and submitted to HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) by the personal representatives of the deceased person’s estate.

The IHT421 form is also known as the Probate Summary, and it provides a summary of the estate assets and liabilities of the deceased person, as well as any exemptions and reliefs that may apply to the estate for inheritance tax (IHT) purposes. The form must be completed and submitted with other necessary documentation to HMRC as part of the application process for a Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration.

The IHT421 form is an important document that helps to determine the amount of IHT payable by the estate, and it must be completed accurately to avoid any delays or errors in the probate process. It is important to note that if the estate is exempt from IHT or if the IHT liability is less than the current threshold, a full IHT400 form may not be required, and the IHT421 form may be used instead.

If you are acting as a personal representative of a deceased person’s estate and are required to complete the IHT421 form, it is recommended that you seek the assistance of a legal or financial professional who can guide you through the process and ensure that the form is completed correctly. It is important to ensure that all necessary information is provided on the form and that any exemptions and reliefs that may apply to the estate are correctly claimed.

If you need some expert guidance a good place to start is with some free probate advice from a probate practitioner from The Probate Network. They can help you navigate the probate process and complete the necessary forms correctly. For advice you can either visit probate advice options a or if you want to know the cost of support from a probate specialist, request a probate quote.

IHT217: Claim for Transfer of Unused Nil Rate Band

This form is used to claim any unused inheritance tax allowance from a deceased spouse or civil partner.

IHT217: Claim for Transfer of Unused Nil Rate Band is a legal form used in the United Kingdom for claiming the transfer of any unused inheritance tax (IHT) nil-rate band from a deceased spouse or civil partner. The form is filed by the personal representative or executor of the deceased’s estate or the surviving spouse/civil partner.

In the UK, every individual has a nil-rate band, which is the amount of money or property they can leave behind upon their death without paying any inheritance tax. The current nil-rate band is £325,000 (as of 2023). If the estate of the deceased person is worth less than the nil-rate band, no IHT is payable. If the estate is worth more than the nil-rate band, IHT is payable on the excess.

he IHT217 form is used to claim the transfer of any unused nil-rate band from the estate of a deceased spouse or civil partner to the surviving spouse or civil partner’s estate. This is known as the transferable nil-rate band or the transferable nil-rate band allowance. The transferable nil-rate band allows the surviving spouse or civil partner to increase their own nil-rate band by the amount of their deceased spouse or civil partner’s unused nil-rate band.

To claim the transferable nil-rate band, the personal representative or executor of the deceased’s estate or the surviving spouse/civil partner must complete the IHT217 form and submit it to HMRC along with the deceased’s estate tax return. The form requires detailed information about the deceased’s estate and their spouse or civil partner’s estate.

It is important to note that there are strict time limits for making a claim for transferable nil-rate band, and it must be made within two years of the end of the month in which the deceased passed away. If the claim is not made within this time frame, the transferable nil-rate band may be lost. It is recommended to seek the assistance of a legal or financial professional to ensure that the IHT217 form is completed correctly and on time.

More Probate Forms

These are just a few of the main probate forms in the UK. The specific forms required will depend on the circumstances of the estate and whether or not the deceased person had a will. It’s important to seek professional advice to ensure that all necessary forms are completed correctly and submitted on time.

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